The July Interview

Ms. Friend, now that your new memoir has launched successfully, and you’ve survived yet another lambing season, how are you coping with the stress?

—-See photo above.

Ms. Friend, we’re sure it’s hot in Minnesota in July, and yet you must continue to do farmwork and write and edit, all without air conditioning. How do you survive?

—-See photo above.

And Ms. Friend, if you don’t mind us asking, where do you do your best writing?

—-See photo above.

We’re so impressed with how hard you and Melissa work. Could you show us what you do on the farm while Melissa is weed-wacking or fixing fence or moving sheep?

—-See photo above.

We’re excited to hear you’ll be publishing another book next year, but your editor hasn’t received any of the manuscript yet. Why not?

—-See photo above.

And finally, Ms. Friend, why didn’t you write an interesting blog entry, one with an amusing farm story or a touching anecdote?

—-See photo above.

8 thoughts on “

  1. LOLOLOL! Two people this week asked me if I’d heard of your new book. One of the links led me to your blog. Absolutely loved the interview. Can’t wait to read more. (I’m a fellow sheep farmer & writer, and now you have me seriously wondering where our hammock has run off to. I haven’t seen it in ages. No wonder I’m so behind on everything. : )

  2. Another writing shepherdess? I’m not the only one? Thank god. I don’t know how many sheep you have, but I recommend 15 minutes a day in the hammock for every 25 sheep you have. This means I’m currently entitled to an hour a day….

    I’ve suggested to Melissa that she relax in the hammock, but after 30 seconds she’s like, “Whoa, getting seasick,” and she hops up and goes back to work.

    What kind of sheep do you have? Are they as cute as ours?

  3. Hilarious! I found my way to your blog from Wendysknits. I don’t know why I don’t know any people with a sense of humour as great as yours! I can’t wait to read your book/tales of sheep farming (something I’ve long dreamed of doing, but guess I’ll continue vicariously for a while at least).

    Beverly

  4. Hilarious! I found my way to your blog from Wendysknits. I don’t know why I don’t know any people with a sense of humour as great as yours! I can’t wait to read your book/tales of sheep farming (something I’ve long dreamed of doing, but guess I’ll continue vicariously for a while at least.

  5. My husband just bought us a farm. We know nothing about farming (luckily, he has a day job!) I anticipate that I will be in a similar position to you in the pic as soon as we move… but with a cold cloth on my forehead. 😉

    A friend recommended your book to me and I can’t wait to buy it. So glad you have a blog as well. I will enjoy learning from you guys.

    I had some difficulty with your RSS feed in my reader – I changed it to feed://www.hitbyafarm.com/atom.xml and it worked (removed “blog”). I don’t know if this pertains to all readers but thought I’d share in case there is an error in the code.

  6. Ha—only another book lover would wonder what I was reading!

    Michael Pollan’s “The Omnivore’s Dilemma.” Lots of facts to wade through, but very interesting. Makes me glad I know where most of the meat in my freezer came from.

    In photo I’m also eating Cheetos (why can’t science figure out how to put all our nutritional requirements into a bag of Cheetos?) and hanging out with Pumpkin. Since I have Cheetos all over my fingers, it’s a good thing the cat is orange.

  7. I read Pollan’s Botany of Desire, and found it fascinating. Have you read that one? I also enjoyed an essay by him that I found on the Internet. He wrote about a feeder calf that he bought and followed along until it became meat. I am on the library’s waiting list for Dilemma. The list is long, but I am hopeful that many are following your example and reading their summer away!

Leave a Reply